Health insurance FAQs

Have you got a question before taking out a Health Insurance policy? You have come to the right page. We have collated some of the most frequently asked questions by customers looking to find out more about Health Insurance.

If your question isn’t on the list or you want to know more information then you may find it in our special Health Insurance Jargon Buster.

What is health insurance?

The main summary for Health Insurance is cover designed to pay for the cost of medical treatments for illnesses and injuries. These treatments will be covered under private care and most often than not on considerable shorter waiting lists than the NHS.

What does health insurance cover?

The answer to this will depend on what policy you take out and the amount that you pay for your policy. In general, health insurance policies can cover things such as treatments for patients whether you are outpatients, in-patients or day patients, as well as any medical consultations you may require. Scans such as MRI scans and X-Rays, including any physio or aftercare appointments can also be covered by your policy. Benefits of having such insurance are shorter waiting times and specialist care on more personal and one to one levels, private hospitals with private rooms and facilities, as well as possible access to wider range of treatments that may not be available to you on the NHS.

Will my health insurance premiums always stay the same?

As with a lot of policies, premiums tend to increase the older you are, due to more medical conditions becoming apparent. Your policy will get reviewed on an annual basis and if you make a claim the likelihood of your premiums increasing will be greater. If you have an active, healthier lifestyle then it is possible your premiums will benefit.

Are there exclusions on my private health insurance?

Although there is a full list of exclusions and inclusions in your policy documents, the main exclusions are normally:

  • Pre-existing conditions
  • Drug abuse and self inflicted injuries
  • Incurable conditions
  • Infertility and relating illnesses
  • Accident and Emergency admissions
  • Cosmetic surgery
  • Preventative treatments
  • Mobility aids